Summary

For every passable pedestrian pathway, there are three good vehicular lanes¹. This shows an imbalance where priority is given to motorised vehicles.

1to3 ratio
an imbalance to provided-space where priority is given to passive mobility, motorised vehicles.

219ha and 40km of streets of Downtown Kuala Lumpur were surveyed. The data collected showed an alarming ratio 1:3 of pedestrian pathways versus vehicle lanes, which means for every passable pedestrian pathway, there are three good vehicular lanes¹. This shows an imbalance to provided-space where priority is given to passive mobility, motorised vehicles.

¹One passable pedestrian pathway is averaged at 1.2m wide, approximately for one wheelchair/ pram to maneuver, whereas one vehicular lane is at 3m wide.

39.53km pedestrian path
±77% inaccessible by *Universal Access Standards
367 crossing points
±79 / ±9% no provision* / proper crossing provision*

About 40km of pedestrian pathway were surveyed and almost 80% (32km) are impassable and not up to *Universal Access Standards. Almost 80% (293) of 367 crossing points have no crossing provisions* where only 9% (33) have provisions* prepared.

31.87km vehicular lane
82% fair to new road condition / 8% bus lanes
82% illegally parked vehicles on vehicle lane
& pedestrian pathways

About 32km of vehicular lane were surveyed and more than 80% (26km) were in fair to new condition, of which only 8% (2.6km) had bus lanes. Over 80% (26km) were encroached with illegally parked vehicles on vehicle lane & pedestrian pathways.

pedes outline

Additional Observations some other notable observations are the obsolescence of the 5 foot way as a viable passageway, the ‘sinking’ of the city, the importance (& the encroachment) of the alleyways / utility roads and the general slower walking speed (4.3kmh/ a quarter slower than average) of the street users of Kuala Lumpur.

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